Jean Negulesco

Jean Negulesco

Jean Negulesco, o Jean Negulescu (Craiova, Rumania, 26 de febrero de 1900 – Marbella, España, 18 de julio de 1993), fue un director y guionista de cine rumano, nacionalizado estadounidense.

  • Fecha de nacimiento: 1900-02-26
  • Falleció: 1993-07-18
  • Lugar de nacimiento: Craiova, Dolj, Romania

English

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jean Negulesco (born Jean Negulescu; 26 February 1900 – 18 July 1993) was a Romanian-born American film director and screenwriter. Born in Craiova, he attended Carol I High School. In 1915 he moved to Vienna, in 1919 to Bucharest, where he worked as a painter, before becoming a stage decorator in Paris. In 1927 he went to New York City for an exhibition of his paintings, and settled there. In 1934 he entered the film industry, first as a sketch artist, then as an assistant producer, second unit director and in the late 1930s he became a director and screenwriter. He made a reputation at Warner Brothers by directing short subjects, particularly a series of band shorts featuring unusual camera angles and dramatic use of shadows and silhouettes. Negulesco's first feature film as director was Singapore Woman (1941). In 1948 he was nominated for an Academy Award for Directing for Johnny Belinda. In 1955, he won the BAFTA Award for Best Film for How to Marry a Millionaire. His 1959 movie, The Best of Everything, was on Entertainment Weekly's "Top 50 Cult Films of All-Time" list. From the late 1960s, he lived in Marbella, Spain where he died there at age 93, of heart failure. During his Hollywood career and in his 1984 autobiography, Negulesco claimed to have been born on 29 February 1900; he was apparently motivated to make this statement because birthdays on Leap Year Day are comparatively rare. In fact, 1900 was not a leap year, so there was no 29 February in 1900. Negulesco's autobiography (in which this claim appears) is appropriately titled Things I Did and Things I Think I Did. Description above from the Wikipedia article Jean Negulesco, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia​','​From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.   David Wayne (January 30, 1914 – February 9, 1995) was an American actor with a career spanning nearly 50 years. Early life and career Wayne was born Wayne James McMeekan in Traverse City, Michigan, the son of Helen Matilda (née Mason) and John David McMeekan. He grew up in Bloomingdale, Michigan. Wayne's first major Broadway role was Og the leprechaun in Finian's Rainbow, for which he won the Theatre World Award and the first ever Tony for Best Featured Actor in a Musical. While appearing in the play, he and co-star Albert Sharpe were recruited by producer David O. Selznick to play Irish characters in the film Portrait of Jennie (1948). It was in 1948 as well that Wayne became one of those fortunate 50 applicants (out of approximately 700) granted membership in New York's newly formed Actors Studio. He was awarded a second Tony for Best Actor in a Play for The Teahouse of the August Moon and was nominated as Best Actor in a Musical for The Happy Time. He originated the role of Ensign Pulver in the classic stage comedy Mister Roberts and also appeared in Say, Darling, After the Fall, and Incident at Vichy.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Rory Calhoun (August 8, 1922 – April 28, 1999) was an American television and film actor, screenwriter, and producer best known for his roles in Westerns. Description above from the Wikipedia article Rory Calhoun, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Cameron Mitchell (November 4, 1918 – July 6, 1994) was an American film, television and Broadway actor with close ties to one of Canada's most successful families, and considered, by Lee Strasberg, to be one of the founding members of The Actor's Studio in New York City. Description above from the Wikipedia article Cameron Mitchell (actor), licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Alexander D'Arcy, ( 10 August 1908 – 20 April 1996) was an Egyptian actor with an international film repertoire. Born Alexander Sarruf in Cairo, Egypt, D'Arcy, variously credited as Alexandre D'Arcy, Alex D'Arcy, Alexandre Darcy and Alex d'Arcy appeared in some 45 films, mostly as a suave gentleman or smooth rogue. His first film appearance was in 1927 in The Garden of Allah, before appearing in Alfred Hitchcock's Champagne (1928). He then went to Hollywood where he started by playing supporting roles in several films in the late 1930s including The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) Stolen Holiday (1937), The Awful Truth (1937). In 1953, he was one of Marilyn Monroe's suitors in How to Marry a Millionaire and featured in Abdulla the Great and Soldier of Fortune in 1955. His roles diminished in importance and by the 1960s he was acting mostly on television before resurfacing in horror films, notably It's Hot in Paradise (1962) and as Dracula in Blood of Dracula's Castle (1969). Evidently a favorite of such cult directors as Roger Corman, Russ Meyer and Sam Fuller, D'Arcy was seen in Corman's St. Valentine's Day Massacre (1967), Meyer's The Seven Minutes (1971) and Fuller's Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street (1972). His last appearance was in a German television detective series in 1973. He died in West Hollywood, California. Description above from the Wikipedia article Alexander D'Arcy, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','William Powell was on the New York stage by 1912, but it would be ten years before his film career would begin. In 1924 he went to Paramount Pictures, where he was employed for the next seven years. During that time, he played in a number of interesting films, but stardom was elusive. He did finally attract attention with The Last Command (1928) as Leo, the arrogant film director. Stardom finally came via his role as Philo Vance in The Canary Murder Case (1929), in which he investigates the death of Louise Brooks, "the Canary." Unlike many silent actors, sound boosted Powell's career. He had a fine, urbane voice and his stage training and comic timing greatly aided his introduction to sound pictures. However, he was not happy with the type of roles he was playing at Paramount, so in 1931 he switched to Warner Bros. There, he again became disappointed with his roles, and his last appearance for Warners was as Philo Vance in The Kennel Murder Case (1933). In 1934 Powell went to MGM, where he was teamed with Myrna Loy in Manhattan Melodrama (1934). While Philo made Powell a star, another detective, Nick Charles, made him famous. Powell received an Academy Award nomination for The Thin Man (1934) and later starred in the Best Picture winner for 1936, The Great Ziegfeld (1936). Powell could play any role with authority, whether in a comedy, thriller, or drama. He received his second Academy Award nomination for My Man Godfrey (1936) and was on top of the world until 1937, when he made his first picture with Jean Harlow, Reckless (1935). The two clicked, off-screen as well as on-screen, and shortly became engaged. One day, while Powell was filming Double Wedding (1937) on one MGM sound stage, Harlow became ill on another. She was finally taken to the hospital, where she died. Her death greatly upset both Powell and Myrna Loy, and he took six weeks off from making the movie to deal with his sorrow. After that he traveled, not making another MGM film for a year. He eventually did five sequels to "The Thin Man," the last one in 1947. He also received his third Academy Award nomination for his work in Life with Father (1947). His screen appearances became less frequent after that, and his last role was in 1955. He had come a long way from playing the villain in 1922.

Filmografía