John Briley

','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Rohini Hattangadi (born 11 April 1955) is an Indian actress of film, theatre and television. She has won two Filmfare Awards, one National Film Award, and is the only Indian actress to win the BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for her performance as Kasturba Gandhi in Gandhi (1982). An alumna of the National School of Drama of New Delhi, Hattangadi had worked mainly in theatre when she made her movie debut with Arvind Desai Ki Ajeeb Dastaan in 1978. Some of her noted cinematic roles were in such art films as Arth (1982), Party and Saaransh (1984). Hattangadi was mostly offered character roles in mainstream Hindi cinema after her portrayal in Gandhi, often typecast in mother roles much ahead of her years. Respected for her acting prowess, she has appeared in over 80 feature films, and is active in theatre and television. Description above from the Wikipedia article Rohini Hattangadi, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Candice Patricia Bergen (born May 9, 1946) is an American actress and former fashion model. She is known for starring in two TV series, as the title character on the situation comedy Murphy Brown (1988–1998), for which she won five Emmy Awards and two Golden Globe Awards; and as Shirley Schmidt on the comedy-drama Boston Legal (2004–2008), for which she was nominated for two Emmys, a Golden Globe, and a Screen Actors Guild Award. She starred in several major films throughout the mid 1960s to early 1980s such as The Sand Pebbles, Carnal Knowledge, The Wind and the Lion, and Gandhi and received an Academy Award nomination for her role in Starting Over. Her later career includes character roles in Miss Congeniality and Sweet Home Alabama. Description above from the Wikipedia article Candice Bergen, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Om Puri ( born 18 October 1950) is an Indian actor who has appeared in both mainstream Indian films and art films. His credits also include appearances in British and American films. He has received an honorary OBE. Description above from the Wikipedia article Om Puri, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','​From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Saeed Jaffrey OBE (born 8 January 1929) is an Indian-born British actor, who has done numerous British movies. He was born in Malerkotla, Punjab. His film credits include The Man Who Would Be King (1975), Shatranj Ke Khiladi (The Chess Players) (1977), Gandhi (1982), A Passage to India (1965 BBC version and 1984 film) and My Beautiful Laundrette (1985). He has also appeared in many Bollywood films in the 1980s and 1990s. For television he has starred in Gangsters (1975–1978), The Jewel in the Crown (1984), Tandoori Nights (1985–1987) and Little Napoleons (1994). He also appeared as Ravi Desai on Coronation Street as the father of Vikram Desai, the cousin of Dev Alahan and in Minder (TV series) as Mr Mukerjee in Series 1 episode The Bengal Tiger. Description above from the Wikipedia article Saeed Jaffrey, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Ian Charleson (11 August 1949 – 6 January 1990) was a Scottish stage and film actor. He is best known internationally for his starring role as Olympic athlete and missionary Eric Liddell, in the Oscar-winning 1981 film Chariots of Fire. He is also well known for his portrayal of Rev. Charlie Andrews in the 1982 Oscar-winning film Gandhi. Charleson was a noted actor on the British stage as well, with critically acclaimed leads in Guys and Dolls, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Fool for Love, and Hamlet, among many others. Over the course of his life Charleson performed numerous major Shakespearean roles, and the annual Ian Charleson Awards were established in his honour in 1991, to reward the best classical stage performances in Britain by actors aged under 30. The Houghton Mifflin Dictionary of Biography describes Charleson as "a leading player of charm and power" and "one of the finest British actors of his generation." Alan Bates wrote that Charleson was "definitely among the top ten actors of his age group." Ian McKellen said Charleson was "the most unmannered and unactorish of actors: always truthful, always honest." Charleson was diagnosed with HIV in 1986, and died in 1990 at the age of 40. He requested that it be announced after his death that he had died of AIDS, in order to publicize the condition. This was the first show-business death in the United Kingdom openly attributed to AIDS, and helped to promote awareness of the disease. Description above from the Wikipedia article Ian Charleson, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','','','','','','​From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.   Ian Bannen (29 June 1928 – 3 November 1999) was a Scottish character actor and occasional leading man. Description above from the Wikipedia article Ian Bannen, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Michael Dennis Bryant (5 April 1928 – 25 April 2002) was a British stage and television actor. Bryant attended Battersea Grammar School and after service in the Merchant Navy and Army, he attended drama school and appeared in many productions on the London stage. He made his film debut in 1955. His greatest role was Mathieu in BBC2's 1970 adaptation of Jean-Paul Sartre's Roads to Freedom trilogy. His guest star appearance as Wing Commander Marsh, who feigns insanity in the 'Tweedledum' episode of the BBC drama series, Colditz (1972), is still widely remembered. Bryant was chosen by Orson Welles to play the lead role in The Deep, Welles's adaptation of the Charles Williams novel Dead Calm. The production frequently ran out of money, and following the death of actor Laurence Harvey in 1973, Welles stopped production and announced the movie - which had been completed except for one special effects shot of a ship exploding - would not be released. (The novel was finally adapted to film in 1989.) In 1969 Bryant took his love of the stage on a strange trip into the realm of cult films, playing a clever male prostitute who outwits a delusional family of killers in the dark comedy Mumsy, Nanny, Sonny and Girly, an adaptation of a play by Maisie Mosco. Due to poor marketing and a lack of faith in the film by the distributor, the film quickly sank into obscurity even before it could develop a cult following. One of Bryant's most memorable performances was in the classic BBC television play The Stone Tape (1972), in which he plays the leader of a team of scientists who investigate ghost sightings in a brooding gothic mansion. Bryant also had a supporting role as a sadistic psychiatrist in the cult classic black comedy The Ruling Class, with Peter O'Toole and Alastair Sim. He also appeared in Richard Attenborough's Gandhi (1982) as a British diplomat. Having played Lenin in the film Nicholas and Alexandria, Bryant would later reprise the role in Robert Bolt's play State of Revolution (1977). He had previously co-starred in Bolt's unsuccessful Gentle Jack. The 1977 production of a Bolt play though was significant for featuring the first role he performed at the National Theatre where he was a constant presence for a quarter of a century. Bryant, described by Michael Billington as "rock-solid company man", had earlier performed with the Royal Shakespeare Company from 1964, including the premiere production of Harold Pinter's The Homecoming (1965), in which he played Teddy, the returning academic. In 1980, Michael Bryant won the London Drama Critics Circle Theatre Award for Best Actor, and his other theatrical performances were equally well thought of. Bryant won Laurence Olivier Awards in 1988 and 1990 and was nominated twice more. Description above from the Wikipedia article Michael Bryant (actor), licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Sir John Selby Clements, CBE (25 April 1910 – 6 April 1988) was an English actor and producer who worked in theatre, television and film. Clements attended St Paul's School and St John's College, Cambridge University then worked with Nigel Playfair and afterwards spent a few years in Ben Greet's Shakespearean Company. He made his first stage appearance in 1930. Clements founded the Intimate Theatre at Palmers Green in 1935, which is a combined repertory and try-out theatre. He appeared in almost 200 plays, and presented a number of plays in the West End as actor-manager-producer. He also started his film work in 1933. Clements was the artistic director of the Chichester Festival Theatre from 1966 to 1973. He married the actress Kay Hammond and together they became a critical success on stage with their West End revival of Noel Coward's play Private Lives in 1945. In 1952 they both appeared in Clements' own play The Happy Marriage, an adaptation of Jean-Bernard Luc's Le Complexe de Philemon. Clements starred as Edward Moutlon Barrett in the musical Robert and Elizabeth, a successful adaptation of The Barretts of Wimpole Street. His stepson is the actor John Standing. As a film actor John Clements came to prominence when the film director Victor Saville chose him to star opposite Ralph Richardson in South Riding (1938). The two actors were reunited in the very successful The Four Feathers (1939). After this Clements' film career was somewhat intermittent although he made a series of British war films for Ealing Studios and British Aviation Pictures, such as Convoy (1940), Ships with Wings (1942), Tomorrow We Live (1943), and as Yugoslav guerrilla leader Milosh Petrovitch in Undercover (1943). He had a cameo role (as Advocate General) in Gandhi (1982). Clements was made a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) in 1956 and knighted in 1968. Description above from the Wikipedia article John Clements, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Sir Nigel Barnard Hawthorne, CBE (5 April 1929 – 26 December 2001) was an English actor, perhaps best remembered for his role as Sir Humphrey Appleby, the Permanent Secretary in the 1980s sitcom Yes Minister and the Cabinet Secretary in its sequel, Yes, Prime Minister. For this role he would win four Bafta Awards during the 1980s in the 'Best Light Entertainment Performance' Category. In the 1990s He would win two more Bafta Awards, one as Best TV Actor for 'The Fragile Heart' and one as Best Film Actor for 'The Madness of King George'. His role in the latter also garnered him his sole Oscar Nomination. Description above from the Wikipedia article Nigel Hawthorne, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia','​From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Bernard Hepton (born 19 October 1925, Bradford, England) is a British actor of stage, film and television. Hepton is known as a particularly versatile character actor. He trained at Bradford Civic Theatre school under Esme Church along with actors such as Robert Stephens. He has extensive stage experience as an actor, under Sir Barry Jackson in addition to a spell as Artistic Director of Birmingham Rep and Liverpool Playhouse. On television, he played Toby Esterhase in the BBC Television adaptations of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy and Smiley's People, and George Smiley in the radio adaptations. He also played the Kommandant in Colditz (1972–74), and later appeared for the same production team as Albert Foiret in three seasons of Secret Army (1977–79). Before that he made a guest appearance in an episode of the first series of Catweazle in 1970 where he played a naturalist. Other notable performances included Thomas Cranmer in both The Six Wives of Henry VIII (1970) and Elizabeth R (1971). He played Sam Toovey in the 1989 television adaptation of Susan Hill's ghost story The Woman in Black. On radio Hepton played the role of Albert, in Stranger In The Home by Alan Dapre, also the role of The Old Man in the Corner, the Baroness Orczy amateur, and mostly sedentary, sleuth in the BBC dramatizations called The Teahouse Detective (1998–2000). His appearances in feature film have been less frequent. He made a brief appearance as Thorpey, a gangster in the classic British film Get Carter (1971), and another small role, as Milton Goldsmith, in Voyage of the Damned (1976). He is a fan of the Rugby League team Hunslet Hawks and also played stand-off for them in the 1952/53 season, winning a Yorkshire Cup Medal. Description above from the Wikipedia article Bernard Hepton, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Sir Michael Murray Hordern (3 October 1911 – 2 May 1995) was an English actor, knighted in 1983 for his services to the theatre, which stretched back to before the Second World War. Description above from the Wikipedia article Michael Hordern, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia','','','','','','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Winston Ntshona (born 6 October 1941) is a South African playwright and actor. Born in Port Elizabeth, Ntshona worked alongside fellow South African Athol Fugard on several occasions and played a minor role in Richard Attenborough's acclaimed film Gandhi. Ntshona also played deposed President Julius Limbani, the subject of a rescue attempt in The Wild Geese (1977). Limbani is based on Moise Tshombe. With Fugard and John Kani, Ntshona wrote the 1973 play The Island, in which he and Kani starred in a number of major international productions over the next thirty years. He and Kani were co-winners of the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play for their performance in both The Island and Sizwe Banzi is Dead, which he also co-wrote. Description above from the Wikipedia article Winston Ntshona, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','','​From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Alok Nath (born 10 July 1956, India) is an Indian film actor who appears in Bollywood movies. He is most notable for playing the role of Haveli Ram in Ramesh Sippy's television series, Buniyaad. Description above from the Wikipedia article Alok Nath, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','','','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Ray Burdis (born Oct 1959 in London) is an English actor, screenwriter, director and film producer. Burdis started acting at eleven years old when he trained at the Anna Scher Theatre in Islington. He appeared in an episode of the classic BBC sitcom Steptoe and Son when he was fifteen, but his first major role was at the age of sixteen, in the Thames Television series You Must Be Joking! , which he also co-created and wrote. He also starred with Phil Daniels in Four Idle Hands, at the time having two hit networked television shows running alternately in the same hour. In 1978 Burdis auditioned for a presenting job on the BBC children's programme Blue Peter as a replacement for John Noakes. Richard Marson's book celebrating the show's fiftieth anniversary records this fact and film of the audition was shown at a BAFTA celebration in October 2008. Burdis came to real prominence when he took the part of cowardly inmate Eckersley in the controversial movie Scum in 1979. He had played the same role two years earlier in a BBC television version of the story, although this was not transmitted for many years due to its graphic nature, hence the cinematic re-make. He later had a small role alongside Daniel Day-Lewis in the film Gandhi (1982). Burdis then played a supporting role as Richard, a gay neighbour in Channel 4's short-lived sitcom "Dream Stuffing" in 1984. After this, he played ambitious photographer Nick Tyler in the BBC comedy Three Up, Two Down. His character was the son and son-in-law respectively of the two lead characters, played by Michael Elphick and Angela Thorne. The series rated over 17million viewers and went on for 5 seasons. In addition to acting, Burdis also co-founded Fugitive - an independent film, television and music production company which started life as a premier music video producer, producing videos for internationally renowned artists such as Elton John, Queen, Tina Turner and George Michael, placing itself in the Top 5 international music video production companies. Burdis also produced The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert for television, the largest ever live outside broadcast at the time, it was transmitted in every country around the world to an audience 40% larger than Live Aid. Burdis’ first foray into television drama was creating the series The Fear, for Euston Films, which was broadcast on the ITV Network. The series was critically acclaimed and was based on the unpublicised real-life gangster scene of the late 1980s. Burdis has subsequently concentrated more on writing, producing and directing. He was the producer of The Krays, the critically acclaimed biopic of the East End gangsters Reggie and Ronnie Kray written by Philip Ridley, and also co-wrote-produced and directed the movies Final Cut and Love, Honour and Obey starring such actors as Jude Law, Jonny Lee Miller, Kathy Burke, Ray Winstone, Rhys Ifans. He also created, co-wrote, produced, directed and starred in the television police fly on the wall docu-comedy Operation Good Guys for three series. The series was awarded the Silver Rose for Best Sitcom and the Prix de la Presse, voted for by the International Press, at the Montreux Golden Rose Festival. Turning his hand once again to acting he went on to co-star in the BBC Two comedy drama series Manchild for two series, along with Nigel Havers, Anthony Head and Don Warrington. Having launched a new film production company Britflick Productions in 2010, Ray Burdis is shooting the controversial film, 'The Wee Man' which is scheduled for production in the late summer 2011 in association with Carnaby films. Ray also had an interesting Music background in his teens: Great British Heroes had their roots in Stars & Stripes, a North London band formed early in 1976 by Ray Burdis (vocals), Graham Reed (gtr), Vince (b) and Rowland Rivron (d). In mid-’76 Rivron quit (later to be a TV celebrity). In the autumn the group entered Strawberry Studios in London to record a single for Lightning Records. At Christmas Great British Heroes hired a manager, Jeff Miller, whose lawyer promptly declared the proposed Lightning contract “not a good idea”: the single was shelved, and in November 1978. Great British Heroes (or GBH, as they were sometimes advertised) played all the usual London venues including The Rock Garden, Upstairs at Ronnie Scott’s, the Nashville and even the Roxy, as well as touring Denmark. Eventually, in late 1979 Ray Burdis quit to concentrate on film work (as both an actor and director he would become a central figure in British TV and cinema) Description above from the Wikipedia article Ray Burdis, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','','​From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.   Avis Bunnage (22 April 1923, Manchester, England, UK – 4 October 1990, England) was a British actress of film, stage and television. She attended Manley Park Municipal School and Chorlton Central School in Manchester. She worked as a secretary and a nursery teacher before deciding to become an actress. She gained stage experience in rep and made her first professional appearance at Chorlton Rep Theatre in Manchester in 1947. Most notably, she appeared as Veronica, the wife of Rigsby, in Rising Damp, for one episode. Bunnage was a member of Joan Littlewood's Theatre Workshop company at the Theatre Royal Stratford East. There she created the role of Helen, the mother in A Taste of Honey, her first West End role when the play transferred to Wynndems Theatre, and also a role in Oh, What a Lovely War! at Stratford East, which also transferred to Wyndams Theatre. When Avis was on holiday from this production for two weeks, her role was taken over by Danny La Rue. Among her other roles for Theatre Workshop were Mrs. Lovitt in Christopher Bond's play Sweeny Todd (the basis for the Sondheim musical), and the title role in a play about the music hall legend Marie Lloyd. In the early years of Coronation Street she played Lucile Hewitt's auntie. She was in the musical Billy at the Theatre Royal Drury Lane, playing the mother of 'Billy Liar'. She played Golda in Fiddler on the Roof, opposite Alfie Bass, at Her Majesty's Theatre in London. Married to Derek Orchard, she died in Thorpe Bay, Southend-on-Sea, Essex, aged 67. Description above from the Wikipedia article Avis Bunnage, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','','

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