Bette Davis

Bette Davis

Bette Davis (Lowell, Massachusetts, 5 de abril de 1908-Neuilly-sur-Seine, París, 6 de octubre de 1989) fue el nombre artístico de Ruth Elizabeth Davis, actriz estadounidense de teatro, cine y televisión. Se destacó por su facilidad al interpretar personajes antipáticos y fue ampliamente apreciada por sus actuaciones en filmes melodramáticos, históricos y ocasionalmente de comedia, aunque sus mayores éxitos los alcanzó con dramas románticos.
Después de aparecer en obras de teatro de Broadway, Davis se trasladó a Hollywood en 1930, donde sus primeros filmes para Universal Studios tuvieron poca aceptación. Se incorporó a Warner Bros. en 1932 y fortaleció su carrera con varias actuaciones aclamadas por la crítica. En 1937, intentó liberarse de su contrato y aunque perdió un procedimiento legal muy publicitado, dio inicio al período más exitoso de su carrera. Hasta finales de los años de 1940, fue una de las actrices del cine norteamericano más importantes, reconocida por su desenvolvimiento apasionado y decidido. Davis fue calificada como una perfeccionista que podía llegar a ser muy combativa y a menudo se hicieron públicos sus enfrentamientos con ejecutivos de los estudios, directores de cine y coprotagonistas. Su manera de ser frontal, su estilo vocal entrecortado y su cigarrillo ubicuo contribuyeron a forjar una imagen pública que a menudo fue imitada y satirizada.
Davis fue cofundadora de la Cantina de Hollywood y fue la primera mujer en ser presidente de la Academia de Artes y Ciencias Cinematográficas. Obtuvo el premio de la Academia como Mejor Actriz en dos ocasiones y fue la primera persona en alcanzar diez nominaciones a los Óscar por sus actuaciones y en recibir el premio a la Trayectoria del American Film Institute. Su carrera pasó por varios períodos de declive y catástrofes personales. Casada en cuatro ocasiones —se divorció en tres de ellas y quedó viuda una vez—, crió a sus hijos prácticamente como madre soltera. Sus últimos años estuvieron signados por un largo período de mala salud, pero continuó actuando hasta poco antes de su muerte por cáncer de mama, con más de 100 películas, ciclos televisivos y obras teatrales en su haber. En 1999, Davis fue seleccionada como la segunda mejor actriz de todos los tiempos en la lista del American Film Institute, solamente precedida por Katharine Hepburn.

  • Fecha de nacimiento: 1908-04-05
  • Falleció: 1989-10-06
  • Lugar de nacimiento: Lowell, Massachusetts, USA

English

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Ruth Elizabeth "Bette" Davis (April 5, 1908 – October 6, 1989) was an American actress of film, television and theater. Noted for her willingness to play unsympathetic characters, she was highly regarded for her performances in a range of film genres; from contemporary crime melodramas to historical and period films and occasional comedies, though her greatest successes were her roles in romantic dramas. After appearing in Broadway plays, Davis moved to Hollywood in 1930, but her early films for Universal Studios were unsuccessful. She joined Warner Bros. in 1932 and established her career with several critically acclaimed performances. In 1937, she attempted to free herself from her contract and although she lost a well-publicized legal case, it marked the beginning of the most successful period of her career. Until the late 1940s, she was one of American cinema's most celebrated leading ladies, known for her forceful and intense style. Davis gained a reputation as a perfectionist who could be highly combative, and confrontations with studio executives, film directors and costars were often reported. Her forthright manner, clipped vocal style and ubiquitous cigarette contributed to a public persona which has often been imitated and satirized. Davis was the co-founder of the Hollywood Canteen, and was the first female president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress twice, was the first person to accrue 10 Academy Award nominations for acting, and was the first woman to receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Film Institute. Her career went through several periods of eclipse, and she admitted that her success had often been at the expense of her personal relationships. Married four times, she was once widowed and thrice divorced, and raised her children as a single parent. Her final years were marred by a long period of ill health, but she continued acting until shortly before her death from breast cancer, with more than 100 films, television and theater roles to her credit. In 1999, Davis was placed second, after Katharine Hepburn, on the American Film Institute's list of the greatest female stars of all time.   Description above from the Wikipedia article Bette Davis, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Anne Baxter (May 7, 1923 – December 12, 1985) was an American actress known for her performances in films such as The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Razor's Edge (1946), All About Eve (1950) and The Ten Commandments (1956).   Description above from the Wikipedia article Anne Baxter , licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Celeste Holm (born April 29, 1917) is an American stage, film, and television actress, known for her Academy Award-winning performance in Gentleman's Agreement (1947), as well as for her Oscar-nominated performances in Come to the Stable (1949) and All About Eve (1950).   Description above from the Wikipedia article Celeste Holm, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Gary Fred Merrill (August 2, 1915 – March 5, 1990) was an American film and television character actor whose credits included more than fifty feature films, a half-dozen mostly short-lived TV series, and dozens of television guest appearances. Description above from the Wikipedia article Gary Merrill, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Hugh Marlowe (January 30, 1911 – May 2, 1982) was an American film, television, stage and radio actor. Marlowe was born Hugh Herbert Hipple in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and began his stage career in the 1930s at the Pasadena Playhouse in California. Marlowe was usually a secondary lead or supporting actor in the films he appeared in. His films included Meet Me in St. Louis (1944), Twelve O'Clock High (1949), All About Eve (1950), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), Howard Hawks' Monkey Business (1952), Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (1956), Elmer Gantry (1960), Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) and Seven Days in May (1964). Marlowe was also a regular on the daytime television soap opera, Another World, the last of four actors to portray Matthews family patriarch Jim Matthews, from 1969 until his death from a heart attack, at age 71, in 1982. Description above from the Wikipedia article  Hugh Marlowe, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.  ','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Gregory Ratoff (20 April 1897 — 14 December 1960) was a Russian-born American film director, actor and producer. His most famous role as an actor was as producer Max Fabian who feuds with star Margo Channing (Bette Davis) in All About Eve (1950). Description above from the Wikipedia article Gregory Ratoff, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','','From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Walter Hampden is the artist name of Walter Hampden Dougherty (June 30, 1879 in Brooklyn – June 11, 1955 in Los Angeles) was a U.S. actor and theatre manager. He was the younger brother of the American painter Paul Dougherty (1877-1947). He went to England for apprenticeship for six years. Later, he played Hamlet, Henry V and Cyrano de Bergerac on Broadway. In 1925, he became manager of the Colonial Theatre on Broadway. He became noted for his Shakespearean roles as well as for Cyrano, which he played in several productions between 1923 and 1936. Hampden's last stage role was as Danforth in the original Broadway production of Arthur Miller's The Crucible. Hampden appeared in a few silent films, but did not really begin his film career in earnest until 1939, when he played the good Archbishop of Paris[1] (Frollo's brother) in The Hunchback of Notre Dame, starring Charles Laughton as Quasimodo. This was Hampden's first sound film ; he was sixty at the time he made it. Several other roles followed—Jarvis Langdon in the 1944 film The Adventures of Mark Twain among them, but all were supporting character roles, not the lead roles that Hampden played onstage. He had a small, but notable role as the long-winded dinner speaker in the first scene of All About Eve (1950), and played the father of Humphrey Bogart and William Holden in Billy Wilder's 1954 comedy Sabrina. These last two films are arguably the ones that Hampden is most well known to modern audiences for. He also played long-bearded patriarchs in biblical epics like The Silver Chalice (1954) and The Prodigal (1955). (In The Silver Chalice, he was Joseph of Arimathea.) Hampden reprised his legendary portrayal of Hercule Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac in the first episode of the radio program Great Scenes from Great Plays, which Hampden hosted from 1948-1949. In addition to his radio roles (The Adventures of Leonidas Witherall), Hampden also appeared in several dramas during the early days of television. He made his TV debut in 1949, playing Macbeth for the last time at the age of 69. His last role was the non-singing one of King Louis XI of France, considered by some to be one of his best performances, in the otherwise unremarkable 1956 Technicolor remake of Rudolf Friml's 1925 operetta The Vagabond King. It was released posthumously, more than a year after Hampden's death. For 27 years, Walter Hampden was president of the Players' Club. The club's library is named for him. Description above from the Wikipedia article Walter Hampden, licensed under CC-BY-SA, full list of contributors on Wikipedia.','From Wikipedia Randy Stuart, born as Elizabeth Shaubell (October 24, 1924 – July 20, 1996), was an American actress in film and television. A familiar face in several popular films of the 1940s and 1950s, and later in Western-themed television series, she is perhaps best remembered as Louise Carey, the wife of Scott Carey, played by Grant Williams, in The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957), now considered an early classic of science-fiction film.','','','','','','','','','','

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